Conflict Over Hook-Up Culture

| | 0 Comments

One of the girls kept talking about how funny it was that she told her friends that she was pregnant, and how hilarious it was that they all believed her. SRA programs recognize the enormous potential that young people have. Studies show that teens who abstain from sex have better academic performance and experience other social benefits, which their peers who are not abstinent miss out on. Students are taught about healthy relationships, how to get out of abusive relationships, goal setting, how to achieve those goals and how to make good decisions. They are also given information on the risks of sexually transmitted diseases STD , contraceptives, and their effectiveness in avoiding pregnancy. The skills that students are taught in the SRA programs will help them resist these kinds of negative pressures, and live a much healthier, truly empowered and fulfilled life. Lastly, abstinence leads to fewer unplanned pregnancies and therefore fewer abortions.

Report Exposes ‘Hook-up’ Culture on Catholic Campuses

Charlotte didn’t go to college looking for booze or hook ups. Yet, like most of her peers, she found herself drawn into it — and who could blame her? Students want to be — and want to appear to be — normal. So it is hardly surprising that many will be swayed by whatever happens to be regarded as the norm.

Kerry Cronin discusses her reflection on the Resurrection over the years. The Problems with the Hook-Up Culture (webcast) What does hook-up culture do that is problematic?

Athlone McGinnis Athlone is a young man whose background gives him unique insight on sociological and cultural changes that are happening today. People wonder why it is that the hookup culture has risen as rapidly as it has, with some still seemingly taken aback by millennial apathy towards dating. Too often, those concerned with these developments look immediately to blame men for the devaluation of relationships. Men are dogs, some say. Recently, Leslie Bell took the time to expose this reality on The Atlantic: Some young women deeply desire meaningful relationships with men, even as they feel guilty about those desires.

Many express the same sentiment again and again: To put such a high premium on relationships was frightening to Katie. Here rests my largest critique of modern feminism. Somewhere along the line, it began to preach a message that went beyond the mere encouragement of equal treatment and the maintenance of female choice.

Faith with benefits : hookup culture on Catholic campuses

Rather, digital pictures have accrued additional functions in the interpersonal exchanges and self-publicizing activities that characterise communication on these media. This paper seeks to contribute to pragmatist conceptions of sexual media , selfie studies and digital pornography by situating the communication that takes place via these media, not as mere representations of the sexual self or of ‘actual’ sexual practices, but forms of practical action that propel some version of the self into one or more of the variously networked and formatted arena of digital culture.

Once the grammar of digital sex is grasped in pragmatic terms as a performative element in specifically assembled, multi-dimensional platforms, then all sorts of material objects and technical processes can be understood to enter into the labour of sexual self-formation see Race, What once might have been read as a two-dimensional form of visual representation elevated to the status of detached self-portraiture can now be grasped as a vehicle for self-articulation, an experiment that seeks to participate in the creation of new attachments, and a potential source of practical self transformation.

The term “hooking up”, meaning an instance of casual sex, differs from hook up culture. A hook up is an act that involves sexual intimacy, claimed by many to be a sexually liberating act. A hook up is an act that involves sexual intimacy, claimed by many to be a sexually liberating act.

In particular, King makes many recommendations for people that work for Catholic colleges and who want to provide students with an alternative to the hookup culture. Jason King provides a complex, sympathetic, but unflinching account of the coercive effects of hook-up culture and the many ways students negotiate it. King is an engaging writer, attentive to the complexities of Catholic subcultures, and well-placed to offer a way forward for the majority of students who seek alternatives to the prevailing norm.

Louis University “The sexual practices of young Catholics often seem inconsistent with their faith commitments-contradictory in terms of how they articulate the goods of friendship and healthy relationships. He combines social research with theological insight and offers us an illuminating picture of what is happening on Catholic campuses and why. McCarthy, author of Sex and Love in the Home “King’s book is a necessary addition to hookup literature. Looking specifically at Catholic colleges and universities, he argues there are four hookup cultures, not one.

His research suggests a student’s religious faith can assist her in generating relationship-forming practices antithetical to stereotypical hookup culture. In short, this is a must read for college educators and administrators, especially those at Catholic institutions, who seek to empower young men and women to pursue healthy personal relationships.

Report Exposes ‘Hook-up’ Culture on Catholic Campuses

The singles featured in the film include two college students, two career women one just beginning in her career and the other in her 30s and a man in his 40s. Find a showing Click here to find a showing of The Dating Project. It is not a skill that our generation really has.

The hook-up culture had given a lot of men reasons to hate on women as well. We live in a world where chastity becomes more and more a contrarian choice. permalink.

Description This report, published by The Cardinal Newman Society CNS Center for the Advancement of Catholic Higher Education, reviews the social science literature that has been published over the last twenty years on student behavior and college policies, including the impact of single-sex residences. CNS is working with experts in the fields of psychology, sociology, theology, student affairs and campus ministry to identify programs and policies that can be tested and replicated on both Catholic and secular campuses.

The report concludes with a sign of hope: This paper provides a systematic review of the social science literature that has been published in the last twenty years on the dating and mating behavior of college students and assesses what many of these researchers have identified as the very real damage done by the embrace of a hook-up culture. The findings are organized into four sections based on specific issues related to sexuality on campus.

The first section defines the hook-up culture and identifies the extent of the problem of casual sexual behavior on college campuses. The second section considers the psychological, spiritual and physical costs of such behavior. The third section considers the role of alcohol in encouraging and expanding the hook-up culture. The fourth section investigates the impact of campus polices and especially those who are hired to implement them.

The paper concludes with a look at students who are taking the lead in promoting chastity and fidelity, and the authors make suggestions for additional research. A Review of the Literature The dynamics surrounding intimate relationships among Catholic college students is of special concern to Catholic families and educators, because these relationships often and eventually lead to marriage.

The Catholic Church teaches that marriage is instituted and ordained by God as the union of one man with one woman, and that sexual behavior is reserved for marriage. This review of social science literature considers whether the student culture on Catholic college and university campuses reinforces these teachings and facilitates the pathway from healthy intimate relationships to marriage.

Historically, colleges and universities—especially Catholic colleges and universities—believed that they needed to play an active role in helping their students find happiness and meaningful relationships with those of the opposite sex during their years on campus.

Uncoupling the hookup culture

Just how prevalent is it? By Lesli White Pixabay. After years of surveying students at Catholic colleges about culture and relationships, Jason King, associate professor of theology at St. Vincent College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania has an answer. The truth is hookup culture has become widespread on college campuses, and Catholic colleges are no exception.

Regardless, hook-up culture is a large part of our college experience. Most people tend to focus on the negative effects of hook-up culture on our society, but hook-up culture isn’t horrible. In reality, hook-up culture allows us to meet people we wouldn’t ordinarily interact with.

The dynamics surrounding intimate relationships among Catholic college students is of special concern to Catholic families and educators, because these relationships often and eventually lead to marriage. The Catholic Church teaches that marriage is instituted and ordained by God as the union of one man with one woman, and that sexual behavior is reserved for marriage. This review of social science literature considers whether the student culture on Catholic college and university campuses reinforces these teachings and facilitates the pathway from healthy intimate relationships to marriage.

Historically, colleges and universities—especially Catholic colleges and universities—believed that they needed to play an active role in helping their students find happiness and meaningful relationships with those of the opposite sex during their years on campus. Until the s, most colleges and universities—secular as well as sectarian—believed it was their duty to offer opportunity situations including dances, clubs and other recreational activities, designed to help their students create and maintain healthy and satisfying intimate relationships.

College administrators used to believe that they needed to take care of their students—both academically and socially. Today, it appears that many student life administrators have moved from a pro-active role in helping to facilitate healthy pair bonding to a reactive role in helping to pick up the pieces and repairing the very real damages when a degraded campus culture of casual sex emerges. The conventional wisdom is that students are best left to their own devices in meeting and mating.

This paper finds significant consequences for both the individual and the institution.

Hook Up Culture Debases People…

It’s a direct consequence of the decline of Christian morality. Your best bet is a relatively conservative Catholic school. It’s not a panacea and there are still issues but the culture of kids as say, the Heights and Holy Cross, is different than it is at BCC. Two of the wildest girls I knew growing up were preachers’ daughters. They were in church every Sunday and lots of days in between, but they also were having lots of sex, booze, and drugs when they weren’t.

Great girls, smart and personable and kind, but their strong Christian views definitely didn’t limit their social interactions.

The “hook-up culture” that has grown since the s has not only separated sex from procreation but also from life-long union in marriage, the other traditional purpose of sex. Even in the ’60s and ’70s, those who had sex outside of marriage tended to rationalize it on the basis that they “loved each other.”.

Posted by Jason King Sep 5, Classic Posts , Current Events , Theology at College 2 As the school year has started, it is worth continuing the discussion of hook-up culture, particularly on the campuses of Catholic colleges and universities. It is a culture of pretend because college students overestimate the number of their peers having sex and on the whole want meaningful relationships.

It is also a culture of coercion. According to the Center for Disease Control , around twenty percent of dating relationships have non-sexual violence, and twenty percent of women in college experience completed or attempted rape. Eighty-five percent of these assailants are known, usually boyfriends, ex-boyfriends, or classmates. One might assume that Catholic colleges and universities would shape people differently and thereby generate a different culture. After all, these communities have an overarching Christian mission of fostering love of God and others.

Moreover, several scientific studies suggest people with greater religious commitment—typically measured by beliefs and additional factors such as worship attendance—report less abuse in relationships , lower rates of drugs and alcohol use, greater success in school, having more engaged parents See Soul Searching , being more engaged in society , being more openly conversant about sex and dating relationships, and are less likely to participate in hook-up culture.

Yet, none of the three studies on dating practices on Catholic colleges and universities found any differences between them and non-religious institutions. In Hooking Up , Kathleen Bogle found that students at the Catholic schools responded similarly to the students at the large state school on issues of sex. Moreover, the students at the Catholic school did not see religion having any influence on their behavior.

Perhaps the best hope is further research. While the three studies above provide indispensable data, they are just the beginning of the research. Bogle included only one Catholic school and Freitas two.

Does “Hookup Culture” Exist on Catholic Campuses?

May 28, By Bob Laird Casual sex on college campuses today, which often grows out of binge drinking,… Los Angeles Times It appears that more young people are starting — finally — to question the “hookup” mentality that has become so common on many college campuses. We can try to dress it up as being freeing or equalizing the genders, but I fear it only leaves us equally impoverished.

Casual sex on college campuses today, which often grows out of binge drinking, leads to sexually transmitted diseases, unwanted pregnancies and low self-esteem. It removes the romance, love and deep caring from relationships between men and women. Yet many American colleges and universities seem to be at least tacitly condoning the culture.

A Roman Catholic Take on the ‘Hook-Up Culture’ March 4, about the “Hook-up Culture” on college campuses and how this relates to religion. Freitas is the author of Sex and the Soul, which studies student attitudes toward sex and religion. Freitas’ talk was sponsored by Lectures and Catechesis of Campus Ministry.

Buried in my reflections on the philosophy behind the problems, I quoted something a reader wrote to me and I commented on it Since then I’ve heard from a number of male Catholic readers who have had this very thing happen to them, with all the inner devastation it entails. Michael Lichens managed to put it succinctly I quote him here with his permission I think a lot of women and men, to be sure think that so long as a relationship never reached a physical level, then it’s okay to walk away from it and feel like you were never in the wrong.

That’s not how even friendship works. Getting close to someone requires responsibility, which I’m beginning to think most folks of my generation just want to avoid. Indeed, the sexual hook up culture has advantages over the non-sexual hook up culture. When two people are simply using each other for physical pleasure, and one gets bored and moves on, that might sting a bit, but it’s simply part of the game.

But when deep emotional and spiritual intimacy develops and one side walks away with the same kind of glibness you’d see in a one night stand that ended, it’s emotionally crushing. And let me take a minute to avoid being politically correct. Every story I’ve heard so far is of women doing this to men – women gaining all the benefits of a non-sexual but intensely intimate relationship and then when things get inconvenient pulling a Pontius Pilate, washing their hands and walking away, convinced that the level of intimacy they shared created no obligations on their part, convinced that the friendship that formed carried with it no responsibilities, blind to the bond that they so casually sever, without a trace of compunction.

That, at least, seem to be the pattern. Perhaps this covers for a certain embarrassment, realizing how close they’ve come to a man, with a kind of closeness that can only end in marriage, sex and babies.

Being An Old School Romantic In A Hookup Culture

Share2 Shares I would also just like to point out, by way of encouragement, to evangelical parents a major implication of her research. To a significant degree, spiritual discipline and diligence by parents and churches in inculcating Christian teaching and practice among their youth is used by God to produce greater purity and happiness. Apparently, there is empirical truth to the proverb Prov. Train up a child in the way he should go and he will not depart from it later in life.

She has produced many scholarly publications and studies. One consistent finding she has observed is that evangelical college students are significantly less likely to hookup than any of their counterparts Catholic or secular.

“Around the late ’80s and the early ’90s, on college and university campuses, the dating script sort of fell off the radar, and the hook-up culture took hold. ‘Hooking up’ had been around for a while — maybe forever — but it really took hold in the party scene,” Cronin told the Register.

Share Article It seems that easy sex is rampant on college campuses today, but new research reveals that students really want romance. When Donna Freitas offered a class on dating and spirituality at St. Is it like this elsewhere? She found casual sex on all but the evangelical campuses, but she also found that students lie about how much sex they have and about liking the culture of casual sex.

Worse, college administrations lie by denying that hook-up culture even exists. The good news, though, is that there is a way out. All it takes, Freitas says, is speaking the truth. What is a hook-up? It often involves alcohol and little talking. How prevalent is hooking up on Catholic campuses?

“Hooking Up” – Jason Evert on Catholic Answers Live


Greetings! Do you want find a sex partner? It is easy! Click here, registration is free!